Location

West Denver

West Denver and the surrounding neighborhoods have changed drastically over the last century. More recently Sloan’s Lake, Edgewater, and Lakewood have transformed into some of the most popular places to live in the entire Metro Area. The area around Luna Flats already has a fascinating story and promises to add even more in the coming years.

LOCATION, LOCATION, LOCATION

Rich History With a Bright Future

It began in earnest in 1891, when an amusement park called Manhattan Beach came to the north shore of Sloan’s Lake. When the park opened its doors it was the largest amusement park west of the Mississippi. The beauty of the park burgeoned as thousands of trees, shrubs, and potted palms were planted in the gardens and picnic grounds. Manhattan Beach lured patrons not only with its beauty, but also with its growing variety of attractions, performances, and athletic events held at the park. Circus acts, live bands, baseball games, and boxing matches were all attractions that kept visitors returning. People enjoyed the view of ascending hot air balloons while acrobats were shot out of cannons. New animals such as camels, tigers, lions, elephants, and various Colorado wildlife were continuously added to the zoo within the park. When, in 1908, Graff sold Manhattan Beach to Albert Lewin, the park became known as Luna Park. Although it shut down for good in 1914, its history was ingrained in the area. Luna Flats borrows some of that history for its name.

As development continues to move west through Denver, the Edgewood neighborhood has benefited from astounding growth (even without an amusement park nearby!). That growth is expected to continue, both in terms of population, per capita income, and the already incredible commercial amenities. Median rents and home prices have been climbing as well and buyers who invest in a home at Luna Flats can capture the equity of an increasingly popular area. New residents will have access to incredible features, easily within walking distance. You can meander into Edgewater and eat at U.S. Thai Cafe or stop into Joy Ride Brewery for a beer. You’ll be able to jog around Sloan’s Lake or take their dogs for a walk along the water. The burgeoning hub of Edgewater Public Market and all its dozens of restaurants and shops are at your fingertips. Target, King Soopers, and all that West Colfax has to offer are within reach as well. Golfers can head south to the Lakewood Country Club. The location is 10 minutes to downtown Denver by car and has easy access to the light rail, both Lamar and Sheridan Stations.

By purchasing a home at Luna Flats, you can become a part of the area’s history as well as it’s future. The added bonus? You’ll be providing for your own future as well.

Area History

Manhattan Beach

Manhattan Beach was one of Denver’s first amusement parks and was located on the North shore of Sloan’s Lake. When the park opened its doors in 1891, it was considered the largest amusement park west of the Mississippi. The park was the vision of German-born Adam Graff, an ambitious immigrant who was an ice cutter at Sloan’s Lake. With funding support from brothers Robert and Ernest Steinke, they were able to open the park while continuing to add newer attractions such as a roller coaster, a dance hall, a zoo, a skating rink, a theater, and more. The beauty of the park burgeoned as thousands of trees, shrubs, and potted palms were planted in the gardens and picnic grounds. A total of 10,000 visitors traveled from all around Colorado by way of horse, buggy, and streetcar for the grand opening.

Manhattan Beach lured patrons not only with its beauty, but also with its growing variety of attractions, performances, and athletic events held at the park. A pleasure barge named “City of Denver” was a Denverite favorite for its gentle cruises in the afternoon and late evenings. Circus acts, live bands, gypsy groups, baseball games, and boxing matches were all attractions that kept visitors returning. People enjoyed the view of ascending hot air balloons while acrobats were shot out of cannons. New animals such as camels, tigers, lions, elephants, and various Colorado wildlife were continuously added to the zoo within the park. There was even a Cinderella coach hauled by a pair of ostriches!

The park’s popularity was short-lived as it suffered from a series of unfortunate events. A horrible accident occurred when a child was fatally injured riding the park’s circus elephant, Roger. An ascending hot air balloon frightened the animal, causing several children to fall from his back. As the animal broke from his trainer’s reins, he trampled a boy to death. Roger was previously known to be gentle and never displayed behaviors to cause concern. Nevertheless, Roger was destroyed soon after, and is believed to still be buried underneath the intersection of 20th and Depew.

On December 26, 1908, a mysterious fire burned the theater and observatory down to cinders. The momentum of the park’s success came to a halt soon after. When Graff sold Manhattan Beach to Albert Lewin, the park became known as Luna Park. Several new attractions were added in an attempt to revive the park’s popularity, such as a smaller theater, a ferris wheel, a carousel, and a new steamboat called “Frolic.” The vessel was to replace the pleasure barge “City of Denver,” which sank after a violent windstorm in 1892. Alas, interest in the park was never the same, and it was permanently shut down in 1914.